Bihar shelter case: ED to attach assets of accused

first_imgThe Enforcement Directorate (ED) has identified the properties of Brajesh Thakur, the main accused in the case involving sexual assault of at least 34 girl inmates at a shelter home in Bihar’s Muzaffarpur for attachment under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA).The agency is probing the money laundering charge on the basis of a First Information Report (FIR) lodged by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) in July last year. The statement of the accused was recently recorded at the Patiala jail in Punjab, where he was kept in judicial custody on the court’s instructions. It is learnt that his assets, worth more than ₹6 crore, have been listed as alleged proceeds of the crime for attachment.The CBI has so far recorded the statement of 33 victims in connection with the case, and most of them have given their testimonies against Mr. Thakur, alleging that he would bring in people for sexually assaulting them.Some victims were allegedly also taken to hotels where they were raped. As directed by the court, each instance of rape is to be treated as a separate charge for the trial of the accused persons.In November last year, the CBI had arrested Shaista Parveen, an alleged close accomplice of Brajesh Thakur, on charges of facilitating sexual abuse of the girl inmates. The victims have also accused her of making them dance before visitors.The Muzaffarpur shelter home was being run by an NGO named Sewa Sankalp Evam Vikas Samiti, whose movable and immovable assets has been frozen pending investigation.As directed by the Supreme Court, based on a Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) report, the CBI has registered nine cases of alleged sexual, physical and mental abuse of inmates at shelter homes in Bihar. Eight more cases on similar charges are to be lodged for the prosecution of all those involved.last_img read more

Marcio Lassiter regains touch at right time

first_imgLassiter averaged just 6.8 points through Games 1 to 4  then, found his groove in Games 5 and 6 where he averaged 20 points per outing.The 31-year-old Lassiter played a vital role in Game 6 as San Miguel evened the series and forced a deciding seventh game on Wednesday, keeping the Beermen’s bid for a fifth straight Philippine Cup alive.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“It was falling tonight. I was kind of mixing it up, going inside and cutting,” said Lassiter after the Beermen’s 98-86 win Saturday at Smart Araneta Coliseum. “Coach [Leo Austria] was telling me to attack more, and I was fortunate to get my first three go in.”Lassiter’s Game 6 performance was also his best shooting night in the series as he converted 50 percent from the field, 7-of-14, including 3-of-6 from the three-point line. SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Making Lassiter’s job lighter was the mere presence of five-time MVP June Mar Fajardo who constantly demanded double-teams that opened his teammates from the perimeter.“I was getting more and more comfortable and the guys were sharing the ball, that’s what we always do, and we’re just continuously sharing the ball,” said Lassiter.“The main focus is June Mar, and I just want to be there when they double, just to give more opportunity for him to work in the post and space the floor.”Lassiter added that San Miguel has to be mentally ready come Game 7 even if it has more experience playing in do-or-die situations.In the past five years under Leo Austria, the Beermen have played in two finals Game 7s and won.ADVERTISEMENT “We’ve been in Game 7s before, and we’ll definitely bank on our experience to carry us,” said Lassiter. “At the same time we know it’s not going to be easy because both teams want to really win this game, and we know it’s going to be a grind out game.”“From this point we have to mentally prepare ourselves. We know it’s going to be a tough battle, so we just have to come out there and stay focused, stay locked in.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess San Miguel, Magnolia on level playing field in Game 7, says June Mar Fajardocenter_img MOST READ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—If there is a player in this series who’s glad to get his rhythm back, it has to be San Miguel’s Marcio Lassiter.The Beermen’s reliable wingman was flat the first four games of the series before turning things around in Games 5 and 6 just in time for the PBA Philippine Cup finale against Magnolia.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew View commentslast_img read more

Video: John Calipari After Towns’ Technical Foul Against LSU: “I Hope We Lose”

first_imgCoach Cal reacting to a Kentucky game.LOS ANGELES, CA – DECEMBER 03: head coach John Calipari of the Kentucky Wildcats reacts to a foul against his team during the first half against the UCLA Bruins at Pauley Pavilion on December 3, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Kentucky pulled out a big win at LSU tonight to push its record to 24-0, but if you believe John Calipari, there were times tonight when he would have welcomed 23-1. Karl-Anthony Towns’ was called for a technical for hanging on the rim midway through the second half, which led to this amazing post-game moment on ESPN. As much fun as that videobomb is, Calipari was livid about the foul, at that point in the game. In the interview he said that he told the team that he hoped they would lose after the foul, and reiterated that point to open his post-game press conference. Calipari goes on to praise his talented freshman as a player and a person, but clearly this mistake, which could have proven incredibly costly in what wound up being a two point game, really bothered him.Kentucky hosts South Carolina this Saturday at 2 p.m.last_img read more

OPP say four deaths in home near Huntsville a triple murdersuicide

first_imgProvincial police say the deaths of four people in a home north of Huntsville, Ont., is being treated as a triple murder-suicide.Police said they received a 911 call at 7:30 p.m. Friday from someone who found the bodies in a home in Ryerson Township, Ont., about 40 kilometres north of Huntsville.Officers who arrived on the scene found two men and two women dead inside and that all four bodies showed obvious signs of trauma.Police have determined that three of the victims – two females and a male – were members of the same family and lived in the house where the crime took place. The fourth deceased person, a male, was not related to the victims.The cause of death has not been released pending the results of a post mortem.Police said firearms had been recovered from the scene.An official in Ryerson Township said she was shocked to learn about the grisly discovery.“This is just horrible,” said Deputy Reeve Barbara Marlow. “I feel so sorry for the people.”“You just don’t hear of this sort of thing going on that often,” she said.last_img read more

Matteo di Micchele Arcosantis Human Resources Co

first_img Matteo di Micchele, Arcosanti’s Human Resources Coordinator, assisted the film crew as Paolo Soleri was leading them through the walkways of Arcosanti.[Photo & text: Pietro Viscomi] Even though Arcosanti is not a city designed around the automobile, the reporters found it an intriguing tourist destination, well worth a stop off the highway. In these images, Paolo Soleri is showing The Vaults and The Ceramics Apse – some of his unique passive solar, silt-cast structures.[Photo & text: Pietro Viscomi] December 15, 2008 Two TV journalists from the Italian car-travel show “Easy Driver” came to interview Paolo Soleri on December 3rd. Currently, the show is exploring the roads of The United States, Canada, The United Kingdom and Ireland. Ilaria Moscato and Marcello Mariucci stopped at Arcosanti on their way between Phoenix and the Grand Canyon.[Photo & text: Pietro Viscomi]last_img read more

Discovery Networks International has acquired a 20

first_imgDiscovery Networks International has acquired a 20% stake in French pay broadcaster Televista. The move will see the global factual broadcaster help develop Televista’s female-skewing lifestyle channels including Via, which has applied for a license to run a digital terrestrial television (DTT) channel.Discovery will give Televista access to its library of female skewing content, while local French programming developed by Televista will be aired on Discovery’s raft of channels internationally including TLC and Real Time.The deal was struck between Televista CEO Gaspard de Chavagnac and Dee Forbes, president and managing director, Discovery Networks Western Europe.Chavagnac said: “I am very pleased to welcome Discovery Networks International, the largest non fiction media company in the world to Televista.  Discovery will bring both  expertise and content we need to accelerate our development especially in Free DTT channels where Discovery is already present in Italy, Spain and Germany.”last_img read more

Study finds elevated cholesterol levels after Christmas break

first_img Source:https://healthsciences.ku.dk/newsfaculty-news/2018/12/danes-cholesterol-levels-high-after-christmas/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 30 2018Large quantities of rich Christmas food appear to boost Danes’ cholesterol levels. Right after the Christmas break, levels are 20% higher than in the summer. So says a new study carried out by researchers from the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at Copenhagen University Hospital and the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen.All that butter and cream in Christmas food may possibly boost cholesterol levels more than assumed up to now. In a new study of 25,000 Danes, researchers conclude that cholesterol levels after the Christmas holiday are 20% higher than they are in the summer.Related StoriesLDL-cholesterol does not predict future cardiovascular events in high-risk heart patientsStatins’ potential to treat MS unrelated to the drug’s cholesterol lowering effectsNew imaging modality identifies presence of cholesterol in arterial plaqueSo the study by researchers at Copenhagen University Hospital and the University of Copenhagen shows that the risk of having elevated cholesterol is six times higher after the Christmas break.”Our study shows strong indications that cholesterol levels are influenced by the fatty food we consume when celebrating Christmas. The fact that so many people have high cholesterol readings straight after the Christmas holiday is very surprising,” says Dr. Anne Langsted, M.D., who is one of the authors of the article.Nine out of ten of the people participating in the so-called Copenhagen General Population Study had elevated cholesterol after Christmas. People who already have high cholesterol should perhaps be even more alert to their cholesterol levels during the Christmas holidays.”For individuals, this could mean that if their cholesterol readings are high straight after Christmas, and they could consider having another test taken later on in the year,” says another of the article’s authors, Dr. Signe Vedel-Krogh, M.D.”In any event, there is a greater risk of finding that you have elevated cholesterol if you go to the doctor and have your cholesterol tested straight after Christmas. It is important to be aware of this, both for doctors who treat high cholesterol and those wishing to keep their cholesterol levels down,” she concludes.​​last_img read more

1 in 6 insured hospital patients get a surprise bill for outofnetwork

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 20 2019About 1 in 6 Americans were surprised by a medical bill after treatment in a hospital in 2017 despite having insurance, according to a study published Thursday.On average, 16% of inpatient stays and 18% of emergency visits left a patient with at least one out-of-network charge. Most of those came from doctors offering treatment at the hospital, even when the patients chose an in-network hospital, according to researchers from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Its study was based on large employer insurance claims. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)The research also found that when a patient is admitted to the hospital from the emergency room, there’s a higher likelihood of an out-of-network charge. As many as 26% of admissions from the emergency room resulted in a surprise medical bill.”Millions of emergency visits and hospital stays left people with large employer coverage at risk of a surprise bill in 2017,” the authors wrote.The researchers got their data by analyzing large-employer claims from IBM’s MarketScan Research Databases, which include claims for almost 19 million individuals.Surprise medical bills are top of mind for American patients, with 38% reporting they were “very worried” about unexpected medical bills.Surprise bills don’t just come from the emergency room. Often, patients will pick an in-network facility and see a provider who works there but isn’t employed by the hospital. These doctors, from outside staffing firms, can charge out-of-network prices.”It’s kind of a built-in problem,” said Karen Pollitz, a senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation and an author of the study. She said most private health insurance plans are built on networks, where patients get the highest value for choosing a doctor in the network. But patients often don’t know whether they are being treated by an out-of-network doctor while in a hospital.Related StoriesStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infections”By definition, there are these circumstances where they cannot choose their provider, whether it’s an emergency or it’s [a doctor] who gets brought in and they don’t even meet them face-to-face.”The issue is ripe for a federal solution. Some states have surprise-bill protections in place, but those laws don’t apply to most large-employer plans because the federal government regulates them.”New York and California have very high rates of surprise bills even though they have some of the strongest state statutes,” Pollitz said. “These data show why federal legislation would matter.”Consumers in Texas, New York, Florida, New Jersey and Kansas were the most likely to see a surprise bill, while people in Minnesota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Maine and Mississippi saw fewer, according to the study.Legislative solutions are being discussed in the White House and Congress. The leaders of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee introduced a package Wednesday that included a provision to address it. The legislation from HELP sets a benchmark for what out-of-network physicians will be paid, which would be an amount comparable to what the plan is paying other doctors for that service.That bill is set for a committee markup next week.Other remedies are also being offered by different groups of lawmakers. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

5 questions for Mark Zuckerberg as he heads to Congress

Citation: 5 questions for Mark Zuckerberg as he heads to Congress (2018, April 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-zuckerberg-congress.html Who owns what is a difficult question to answer, and Facebook clearly hasn’t been good at explaining it. While you can download everything the company knows about you, it doesn’t really allow you to take “your” data to a rival.Sandberg told Today’s Savannah Guthrie that given Facebook’s ad-driven business model, you can’t currently avoid data mining of your public profile information. (You can opt not to see the resulting targeted ads , though.) Allowing that, Sandberg said, would effectively require Facebook to turn into a “paid product” that charges users.POSSIBLE FOLLOW-UP: Don’t other businesses allow some users to opt out of ads? Why can’t Facebook charge users who want ad-free experiences the way Hulu and YouTube do?___QUESTION: Facebook has made connecting with others and sharing information dead simple. Why haven’t you put similar effort into making your privacy controls equally easy to use?CONTEXT: Facebook has updated its privacy settings seven times in the last decade, each time aimed at making them simpler to use.The latest update was on March 28. On April 4, the company announced new technical changes designed to close loopholes that allowed third parties overbroad access to user data.Facebook makes many pieces of information your profile public by default; to lock them down, you have to change those settings yourself.POSSIBLE FOLLOW-UP: Does this legacy suggest the government needs to step in with clear and universal privacy rules?___QUESTION: Did Facebook threaten legal action against the Guardian newspaper in the U.K. regarding its reporting on the Cambridge Analytica scandal?CONTEXT: John Mulholland, editor of the Guardian US, tweeted in March that Facebook had threatened to sue to stop publication of its story that broke the Cambridge Analytica scandal in mid-March. Neither the Guardian nor Facebook have commented further.POSSIBLE FOLLOW-UP: Do you still stand behind Facebook’s actions here?___QUESTION: Have you spoken with critics, including some former Facebook investors and colleagues, who argue that the company’s service has become an addictive and corrosive force in society?CONTEXT: Sean Parker, Facebook’s first president, said Facebook specializes in “exploiting” human psychology and may be harming our children’s brains. An early investor in Facebook, Roger McNamee compared Facebook to an addictive substance such as nicotine and alcohol.Brian Acton, a co-founder of WhatsApp (acquired by Facebook in 2014), recently recommended that people should delete their Facebook accounts . Chamath Palihapitiya, an early vice president at Facebook, said Facebook’s tools are “ripping apart the social fabric.”POSSIBLE FOLLOW-UP: If not, why not? Facebook is struggling to cope with the worst privacy crisis in its history—allegations that a Trump-affiliated data mining firm may have used ill-gotten user data to try to influence elections. Zuckerberg and his company are in full damage-control mode, and have announced a number of piecemeal technical changes intended to address privacy issues.But there’s plenty the Facebook CEO hasn’t yet explained. Here are five questions that could shed more light on Facebook’s privacy practices and the degree to which it is really sorry about playing fast and loose with user data—or just because its practices have drawn the spotlight.___QUESTION: You’ve said you should have acted years ago to protect user privacy and guard against other abuses. Was that solely a failure of your leadership, or did Facebook’s business model or other factors create an obstacle to change? How can you ensure that Facebook doesn’t make similar errors in the future?CONTEXT: Zuckerberg controls 59.7 percent of the voting stock in Facebook. He is both chairman of the board and CEO. He can’t be fired, unless he fires himself. “At the end of the day, this is my responsibility,” he told reporters on a conference call last week. He also admitted to making a “huge mistake” in not taking a broad enough view of Facebook’s responsibility in the world.Zuckerberg, however, has been apologizing for not doing better on privacy for 11 years . In the current crisis, neither he nor chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg have clarified exactly how Facebook developed such a huge blind spot, much less how it can prevent history from repeating itself.POSSIBLE FOLLOW-UP: Does Facebook need a chief privacy officer with the authority to take action on behalf of users?___QUESTION: Who owns user data on Facebook, the company or the users? If it’s the latter, why shouldn’t Facebook allow people to opt out of being targeted by ads?CONTEXT: Facebook collects data on its own (your likes, which ads you click on, etc.); keeps data you share yourself (photos, videos, messages); and correlates data from outside sources to data on its platform (email lists from marketers, and until recently, information from credit agencies). This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Firefox maker Mozilla to stop Facebook advertising because of data scandal © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Congress has plenty of questions for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who will testify on Capitol Hill Tuesday and Wednesday about the company’s ongoing data-privacy scandal and how it failed to guard against other abuses of its service. Explore further read more