Red Force wary of Jaguars’ spin for NAGICO Super50 semi-final

first_imgPORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC):Defending champions Trinidad and Tobago Red Force are wary of a dangerous spin attack when they meet Guyana Jaguars in the first semi-final of the NAGICO Super50 Tournament at the Queen’s Park Oval here today, starting at 12:30 p.m. (Jamaica time).Captain Jason Mohammed has admitted that his batsmen will have to step up if they are to defeat the persistent Jaguars and remain on course to retain their title.”I think the batting department is going to be the most difficult part of it. We see that the pitch is spinning a lot, and they have some quality spinners, but in saying that we have some quality batters in our team as well,” said Mohammed.”So I think we have the ammunition to counteract the Guyana bowlers, and hopefully we will come out on top tomorrow in terms of the batting, and the bowling will take care of itself.”In the preliminary phase of the tournament, Guyana posted four wins and suffered two defeats, while Trinidad and Tobago registered four wins and one loss.”It’s going to be a tough game; at the end of the day, we have to enjoy it as cricketers. This is the moment we cherish, when we beat the best team and we come up good against the best team and the best bowlers.”The match will be a repeat of last year’s grand final when the Red Force – inspired by a hundred from current captain Jason Mohammed and spell-binding bowling from champion spinner Sunil Narine – completed a comprehensive 135-run victory to take the title.”I don’t think the guys will be thinking a lot about it (revenge),” declared Leon Johnson, the captain of the Guyana Jaguars.”I think it will be a negative … us losing last year in the finals to Red Force … but we will probably have it a little bit in the back of our minds.”We just have to go out and play the game hard,” he said. “They will have a lot of crowd support obviously, and we normally get good support here in Trinidad as well, so we are looking forward to a good game.”last_img read more

United Airlines Will Now Pay Voluntarily Bumped Passengers Up To 10000

first_imgJulio Cortez/APStung by criticism and a public outcry over the forced removal of one of its passengers, United Airlines is boosting its payments to passengers to give up seats to ease overbooking.United Airlines is making changes after a man was forcibly removed from one of its flights earlier this month, promising to cut down on overbooking and raise the maximum incentive for passengers to skip a flight to $10,000.On the flight that became a public-relations nightmare for the company, compensation for being voluntarily bumped had topped out at $1,000.United will “empower its personnel to make decisions and find solutions that make sense for both customers and employees,” CEO Oscar Munoz said in a letter to senators Wednesday that was sent in response to inquiries about the unusual removal.In all, United announced 10 policy changes in response to the sharp criticism it received over a debacle that unfolded on a United Express Flight on April 9, after passenger David Dao refused to give up his seat on a flight he’d already boarded, so the crew could make room for airline staff. He was eventually dragged out by security officers, suffering injuries in the process.From now on, United says, it won’t “require customers seated on the plane to give up their seat involuntarily unless safety or security is at risk.” The airline also says it will limit its use of law enforcement officers.The increased compensation puts United in line with rival airline Delta, which announced days after the forced removal in Chicago that it was increasing its maximum compensation for passengers giving up seats to nearly $10,000, up from $1,350.United’s other changes include making sure airline crews are booked onto flights at least an hour before the scheduled departure time. United also says it will create an automated system to solicit volunteers to change their travel plans when flights are overcrowded, and give more training to its employees.The April 9 incident on a flight from Chicago to Louisville triggered a firestorm of outrage against United, fueled by videos of the confrontation and what was seen as a tone-deaf response from the airline, whose initial explanations ignored the violence on one of its planes and stated simply that one customer had “refused to leave.” Soon after, United’s CEO Munoz stated, “I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers.”There have been calls for United Airlines officials to testify in Congress about the confrontation, and the Senate Commerce Committee has been in touch with Munoz, seeking more details.Munoz sent the panel a letter Wednesday in response to senators’ questions, in which he said the airline crew had been designated “must-ride” on the oversold Chicago-Louisville flight because they were scheduled to operate a flight out of Louisville the next morning, and their original flight had been delayed.The “must-ride” decision was made, Munoz said, so the crew could get the mandatory amount of rest required by the FAA and to avoid further delays for “many other customers down line.”Replying to the Senate panel’s question about compelling a passenger to get off a plane, Munoz said, “It is rare that a passenger is denied boarding after already having been seated.”Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more