Wish I was as confident as Riyan Parag at 17: Steve Smith

first_img – advertisement 166/5 No data available! 163/7 vs (19.4) Super Over Punjab Punjab PNJ Match Ended view more view less Delhi beat Punjab by 5 wickets Indian Premier League, 2019 Delhi Indian Premier League, 2019 Time: (GMT) | 20:00 (Local Time) 163/7center_img (20.0) Series Status: Player Of The Match: Shreyas Iyer (19.4) 166/5 Wish I was as confident as Riyan Parag at 17: Steve SmithIn a crucial IPL match for Rajasthan Royals, Steve Smith and Riyan Parag stitched a 69-run partnership to defeat Mumbai Indians and keep their hopes of making the playoffs alive. Anita Jat JaipurApril 20, 2019UPDATED: April 20, 2019 23:08 IST Steve Smith scored 59 runs as Rajasthan defeated Mumbai Indians on Saturday. ( Courtesy by BCCI)HIGHLIGHTSTeenager Riyan Parag scored 43 off 29 balls for Rajasthan Royals in Jaipur on SaturdaySteve Smith smashed an unbeaten 59 to take RR home in their 162-run chaseRajasthan defeated Mumbai by 5 wickets after a strong stand between Smith and ParagAfter registering a crucial win over Mumbai Indians on Saturday, newly-appointed Rajasthan Royals captain Steve Smith praised 17-year-old Riyan Parag for his impressive knock of 43 from 29 balls and predicted a bright future for the young batsman.”Parag was really impressive; I have been watching him in the nets and with the bat looks like a seasoned campaigner,” skipper Smith said during the post-match presentation ceremony.”He’s a great kid and has a great future, I hope I was as confident when I was 17. When you are young and come into a team you have a carefree attitude and kept playing his shots,” Smith added.Steve Smith and Riyan Parag stictched 69 runs together for the fourth wicket to hand Rajasthan a much-needed five-wicket win over Mumbai Indians at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium.Replacing Ajinkya Rahane as the Rajasthan Royals captain, Steve Smith impressed with an unbeaten 59 runs in 48 balls to hand his team only their third win in eight matches.Smith admitted that he didn’t have the desired impact with the bat in the previous Rajasthan Royals’ matches in IPL 2019 but hoped to carry forward the momentum from here.”I haven’t contributed as much as I would’ve liked through the tournament and it feels really nice to have gotten the boys over the line. Hopefully, we can carry it forward from here,” Smith said of his performance.Rajasthan are currently placed only above Royal Challengeres Bangalore, fetching six pints from three wins.Talking about a struggling Rajasthan in the IPL 2019, Smith said, “We just need to stay focussed on the processes, we just need to turn up and win. Every game’s a final, and we have to win each one. Let’s hope it turns out well for us.”advertisementSpeaking about Jofra Archer’s dropped catches Smith said, “It’s never good when you don’t take your catches, but Jofra pulled it back really well for us with the ball and was terrific.”Rajasthan Royals will next host Delhi Capitals on Monday.Also Read | DC vs KXIP Live Score, IPL 2019: Delhi spinners dent Punjab chargeAlso Read | RR vs MI, IPL 2019: 17-year-old Riyan Parag and Steve Smith stun Mumbai IndiansAlso See For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnita Jat Tags :Follow IPL 2019Follow Steve SmithFollow Riyan ParagFollow Mumbai IndiansFollow Rajasthan Royals Referee: Prakash Bhatt (IND) Umpires: Ulhas Gandhe (IND), Chettithody Shamshuddin (IND) and Bruce Oxenford (AUS) (20.0) Scorecard Toss: DEL elected to field graphs Delhi DEL Indian Premier League, 2019, Match 37 Match Ended commentarylast_img read more

New UN report warns of devastating effects from ongoing destruction of mangrove

In a new report launched today at the 16th Global Meeting of the Regional Seas Conventions and Action Plans, held in Athens, Greece, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) warned that the deforestation of the planet’s mangroves was exceeding average global forest loss by a rate of three to five times, resulting in economic damages of up to $42 billion annually and exposing ecosystems and coastal habitats to an increased risk of devastation from climate change. “The escalating destruction and degradation of mangroves – driven by land conversion for aquaculture and agriculture, coastal development, and pollution – is occurring at an alarming rate, with over a quarter of the earth’s original mangrove cover now lost,” said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner.“This has potentially devastating effects on biodiversity, food security and the livelihoods of some of the most marginalized coastal communities in developing countries, where more than 90 per cent of the world’s mangroves are found,” he added. The Executive Director noted that mangroves – which are found in 123 countries around the world – provide ecosystem services worth up to $57,000 per hectare per year, storing carbon that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and providing the over 100 million people who live in their vicinity with a variety of goods and services such as fisheries and forest products, clean water and protection against erosion and extreme weather events. Mr. Steiner stressed that their continued destruction “makes neither ecological nor economic sense.”In addition to the economic problems posed by mangrove deforestation, the report, entitled The Importance of Mangroves: A Call to Action, also cautions that a continued reduction in the surface area of mangrove forests would inevitably expose coastal environments to the harmful effects of climate change. In the Caribbean, for instance, mangrove-lined “hurricane holes” have functioned for centuries as safe-havens for boaters needing to ride out storms. Meanwhile, the complex network of mangrove roots can help reduce wave energy, limit erosion and form a critical barrier to the dangers posed by the strengthening tropical storms, cyclones and tsunamis which have been assailing coastal communities in recent years due to climate change.In order to safeguard what UNEP calls “one of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet,” the report outlines a number of financial mechanisms and incentives designed to stimulate conservation, including the creation of a Global Mangrove Fund, encouraging mangrove conservation and restoration through carbon credit markets, and promoting economic incentives as a source of local income from mangrove protection, sustainable use, and restoration activities. Mr. Steiner admitted that it was important to present the survival of mangroves in real terms, underlining the economic impact their destruction would have on the local and global communities and pushing for greater international concern for their overall preservation. “By quantifying in economic terms the value of the ecosystem services provided by mangroves as well as the critical role they play in global climate regulation, the report aims to encourage policymakers to use the tools and guidelines outlined to better ensure the conservation and sustainable management of mangroves.” read more

More holiday please New haul of Roman letters reveals army life near

first_imgIn 1992, Robin Birley made arguably the most important find in British archaeological history when he uncovered a huge trove of soldiers’ letters from the Roman fort of Vindolanda, near Hadrian’s Wall.As scholars picked through the well-preserved accounts of legionnaire life on the edge of empire, a star character emerged: Masclus, and in particular, his demands for more beer.Now, 25 years later, Birley’s son Andrew claims to have discovered another haul of correspondence, which again appear to include written demands from the same Roman cavalry officer – except this time he wants to go on holiday. This is the find I have been hoping for all my working lifeAndrew Birley, Archaeologist Vindolanda dig letters Vindolanda from the airCredit:Telegraph Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Many of the letters are written on slivers of birchCredit:Telegraph “My father has been rather poorly recently, but by the time I got home he had cracked open a bottle of champagne.”Most of the hundreds of letters already found at Vindolanda, near Bardon Mill on Northumberland, are in the care of the British museum, with a handful on loan at the ruined fort.They are considered some of the most famous existing documents from the Roman world, remarkable for their highly personal, warts-and-all account of army life. Archaeologists had to dig deep trenches to find the latest haulCredit:Telegraph The large oak-leaved document is currently illegible and the ink faded, but it is hoped the writing will be deciphered with use of infrared.The Bloomberg find comprise 405 well preserved wooden tablets found at the site of what is now the London offices of the financial data company.The earliest written documents found in Britain, they were found 40 feet underground following the demolition of a 14-storey office block which was built in 1953.The site had been partly excavated in the 1950s, but it was only after 2010 archeologists were able to dig properly. The new letters, believed to originate in the 1st Century AD, were found in a trench at the deepest level of the complex, which was repeatedly rebuilt over the years with turf and timber.Mr Birley said: “They were spaced out at regular intervals along the line of a trench, under a rubble-filled foundation layer.“We wondered if somebody was carrying them in a bag with a hole in one corner, or if somebody had been walking along reading them and chucking them away one by one.”While the Vindolanda letters are believed not to be as old as the Bloomberg Tablets, which were discovered in London between 2010 and 2013, they are more intimate in nature.“There is nothing more exciting than reading these personal messages from the distant past,” said Mr Birley. “These are not Post-It notes.“These were written when somebody had something of importance to communicate.” Vindolanda dig Vindolanda from the air The new cache of 25 letters were found last month in the deepest level of the fort complex and are now being conserved ahead of scanning with infrared lights.This should make the now faint ink marks legible, but experts already believe they have discovered a written request from Masclus, asking for leave from his duties.Most of the missives are, like those of the original big find, written on thin sheets of birch, however experts are particularly excited about a double-leaved oak tablet, which indicates it contains important correspondence. “This is the find I have been hoping for all my working life,” said Andrew Birley, who was a teenager when his father discovered the main haul, and now leads the trust which owns the site.last_img read more