Harvard racks up postseason honors

first_imgThe Harvard football team may have fallen short of their goal of the 2009 Ivy League Championship, but the Crimson certainly dominated the postseason awards with four players named to the New England Football Writers’ Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) All-Star Team and 19 members of the team named All-Ivy League.Harvard’s four All-New England FCS selections, which included offensive lineman James Williams ’10, defensive tackle and team captain Carl Ehrlich ’10, linebacker Jon Takamura ’10, and defensive back Derrick Barker ’10, was tied with New Hampshire and Holy Cross for the most selections of any school.Of the 19 All-Ivy selections, an achievement that tied for the third-most in league history, five were named to the first team, 10 were named to the second team, and four were honorable mention selections.Both the two-time All-American Williams and Barker were also named to the All-Ivy first team, and were joined by offensive lineman Ben Sessions ’10, running back Gino Gordon ’11, and next year’s team captain, Collin Zych ’11.Highlighting the awards was freshman running back Treavor Scales, who was named to the second team and honored as the Ivy League Rookie of the Year after recording 485 yards on 108 carries and five touchdowns in his first season at Harvard despite sharing carries with the Ivy League’s top rusher, Gordon. Scales finished the season sixth in the league in rushing yards and third in rushing touchdowns.For a complete list of Harvard’s All-Ivy selections, visit GoCrimson.com.last_img read more

Produce Safety.

first_imgThe registration deadline has been extended on a fresh-produce food-safety workshop in Atlanta. The Nov. 14-16 workshop will focus on making fresh fruits and vegetables safer from the farm to the produce shelves.The workshop is called “Developing and Implementing GAPs and GMPs for Evaluating Food Safety for the Fresh Produce Industry.” (GAPs are good agricultural practices, and GMPs are good manufacturing practices.)Originally Oct. 12, the registration deadline has been moved to Nov. 2. Just print out a registration form and fax (706-542-9066) or mail it in.Grower to Packer to ShipperThe program is tailored to the grower, packer, shipper and third-party auditor. University of Georgia scientists and other experts will show how to recognize potential hazards in on-farm, packing and shipping operations. And they’ll show how to develop a food safety plan for the participants’ specific operations.It will all begin at 8 a.m. Nov. 14 at the Holiday Inn Airport North in Atlanta. It will end at noon on Nov. 16. The registration fee is $475 for United Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Association members or $525 for nonmembers.For more information, call (706/542-0993), fax (706/542-9066) or e-mail UGA food scientist Bill Hurst.last_img read more

Support palliative care not euthanasia, urges NSW Council of Churches

first_imgChristian Today Australia 9 May 2013The NSW Council of Churches today called on all members of the NSW Legislative Council to vote against a private member’s bill that would legalise euthanasia and assisted suicide in NSW.“This is a dangerous bill. If enacted, the bill will redefine the value of the lives of some people as not worth living. Our challenge as a society is to transform the experience of people who are disabled or dying, not to intervene to end their lives,” the President of the NSW Council of Churches, the Reverend Dr Ross Clifford, said.“For Christians, the Bible makes it clear that human life and human dignity must be protected. We already have good laws and policies that support compassionate care of the terminally ill. If the system is not broken, don’t try to fix it,” Dr Clifford said.“Advances in palliative care make assisted death unnecessary. Instead of wasting taxpayers’ money on reviews of every death by euthanasia, the NSW Government should improve resources for palliative care so that terminally ill patients in our community receive the care and comfort they deserve at the end of life to minimize suffering.”“This bill will enshrine the right to kill and be killed in NSW law. It will endanger disabled people who cannot speak for themselves, and who may be seen as an unnecessary burden by their family or the state. We cannot be sure the proposed law will never be extended to include incapacitated patients.The legal right to kill patients does nothing to enhance human dignity, yet this bill makes medical homicide legal. Should we dismiss concerns of doctors who say, ‘This is not what we became doctors to do’? I urge all NSW politicians to vote against the Rights of the Terminally Ill Bill 2013,” Dr Clifford said.http://au.christiantoday.com/article/support-palliative-care-not-euthanasia-urges-nsw-council-of-churches/15393.htmlast_img read more