Rooster Walk Announces Late-Night Schedule With Marcus King & Billy Strings’ New Project, TAUK, More

first_imgRooster Walk Music & Arts Festival will take place May 24-27, 2018 at Pop’s Farm in Martinsville, VA. Headlining the tenth annual event are The Wood Brothers, JJ Grey & Mofro, Robert Randolph and the Family Band, The Marcus King Band (x2), and Billy Strings. In addition to the rest of the stacked lineup which features The Jerry Douglas Band, TAUK, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, Zach Deputy, and more, the festival has announced the official Late Night Schedule.On Thursday night, The Commonheart will perform a late-night set from 10pm-12am. As the festival kicks into full gear for the weekend on Friday, JJ Grey & Mofro will close down the main stage. Then, later that evening, TAUK will perform the Lake Stage while the debut performance of “King & Strings”–a collaboration between two dynamic young musicians, Marcus King and Billy Strings band, and drummer Jeff Sipe–close down Pine Grove. On Saturday night, The Wood Brothers will close down the Main Stage, while The Marcus King Band and The Mantras party through 2am on the two other stages. Sunday night will close with The Last Yaltz, a tribute to The Band‘s The Last Waltz featuring Yarn with special guests.In addition to the above late-night shows, Rooster Walk 10 will see full performances from Colter Wall, The Dustbowl Revival, Town Mountain, Yarn, Dangermuffin, The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, The Southern Belles, Cris Jacobs, Jeff Sipe, Ron Holloway, Josh Shilling, Front Country, Victor Wainwright & The Train, The Trongone Band, Kat Wright, Wild Ponies, The Commonheart, Fireside Collective, Erin and the Wildfire, Porch 40, Kendall Street Company, Songs From The Road Band, Sanctum Sully, Jay Starling, Wallace Mullinax, Violet Bell, Half Moon, After Jack, Jason Springs Band, PHCC Jazz Band, Prosperity’s Folly, Gunchux, Juliana MacDowell, Fernandez Sisters, The Wildmans, and Aaron Crowe.To buy your tickets or learn more information about Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival’s 10th year, visit the festival website.last_img read more

Paradise Lost

first_imgTwo friends contend with spiders, snakes, and male-pattern baldness on a road trip through Pisgah National Forest.I seriously doubt Moses could clear this ditch,” Jeremiah says as he shoulders his mountain bike and steps gingerly across the log bridge that spans a relatively dry seasonal creek bed. “And yes, I’m aware that he parted the Red Sea.”We’ve been discussing the hypothetical mountain biking skills of various biblical figures. It’s just one of those tangents you find yourself on when you’re miles deep into the forest on a bike with one of your best friends.We’re riding Cove Creek Trail in North Carolina’s Pisgah National Forest. For the most part, the trail is mind-blowingly fun, with just enough elevation drop to keep you from having to pedal, but not so much that it sketches you out. The tread is even smooth—practically manicured by Pisgah standards—with low berms at most turns and easy-going rolling dips. The whole ride plays out like a carefree linear pump track in the heart of one of the gnarliest national forests in the country. But every once in a while on Cove Creek, you have to cross a momentum-killing creek bed with a steep drop over jagged ill-kempt stairs leading to a slick as snot log bridge which carries you directly into the other side of the creek, which is near vertical with three-foot-high steps rising to level ground. There are half a dozen of these technical juggernauts, and we can’t imagine anyone clearing every single one of them on a bike. Not even Moses.Jeremiah and I are a couple of hours into a mini mid-life crisis escape. Picture two guys in their mid-30s with varying degrees of baldness who spend their days either trapped inside a cubicle or trying to convince their children to take a nap. Picture them reminiscing about their previous lives (pre-career and pre-kid), where days were spent mountain biking, trail running, and tromping through steep mountain creeks. This trip is our desperate attempt to recapture that youth: A two-day mini-road trip through Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests packed with mountain biking, rock climbing, hiking, and swimming holes. I suppose we could’ve gone with the traditional hair-plug and convertible douche-mobile route, but two days killing it in the woods seemed to be more our speed.The trip begins with an easy grind up a gravel road leading to Daniel Ridge Loop, a four-mile singletrack horseshoe that climbs and descends the slope hovering above the popular Davidson River. Uber-hip Brevard is just 10 minutes down the road. Our homes in Asheville are only 45 minutes away.We have less than two full days of freedom ahead of us, so we’re keeping the road miles low and focusing on the adventures in our backyard. The plan is to drive a single road (FR 475) that cuts through the middle of Pisgah before running into Nantahala National Forest, bagging as many adventures as we can along the way. We have a checklist to work through, sort of a backlog of adventures that we’ve neglected over the last year. Bike some of Pisgah’s classic singletrack. Climb the boulders at the base of Looking Glass Rock. Camp. Hunt for waterfalls. My tiny 15-year-old Jetta is loaded down with bikes, tents, sleeping bags, a huge crash pad that Jeremiah thinks looks like one of those sex props you see in the back of shady men’s magazines, and more wicking fabric than we could use in a week.Waterfall in Pisgah National ForestDaniel Ridge Loop follows the Upper Davidson for the first half-mile, taking us past primo unused campsites and one very sensitive-looking barefoot guy playing the guitar to himself on the side of the river. As soon as the tread transitions from gravel to singletrack, our pace slows down. We’re hitting the trail after a thunderstorm, so we get sucked into thick patches of black mud and fumble through root gardens still glistening from the rain. Daniel Ridge has a number of steep fall-line climbs littered with fist-sized rocks. Mountain biking is all about rhythm and momentum. We have neither, so we end up walking anything remotely technical. I blame the slick conditions, but in the back of my head, I know it’s because we’ve forgotten the nuances of mountain biking. After years of building up our skills in Pisgah, we’re starting from scratch, veritable babes in the woods.The higher we climb up the ridge, the bigger and slicker the boulders get. After pushing up the trail and praying that no one we know passes by, we top out and begin the bomber descent, which is just as steep, but considerably less rocky. Instead of boulders, we navigate hip-deep ruts in the dirt and the occasional well-worn waterbar drop. I brake too much and have to stop occasionally to shake out my hands and forearms. By the time we hit Cove Creek Trail, muscle memory has kicked in and we fly through the singletrack giggling like schoolgirls…or two overworked dads playing hooky from all sorts of responsibilities. We know the emails are piling up. We know our kids are throwing tantrums and eating junk food. But there’s nothing we can do about it. We’re riding bikes.We’re speckled with dark mud after the ride, so we head straight to Whaleback, an ice-cold swimming hole with a small rock slide and jump that’s popular with the YMCA summer camp crowd. We soak our legs and try to remember the last time we rode bikes together.“One thing’s for sure,” Jeremiah says. “We’re not very good at mountain biking anymore.”After setting up camp between a dusty forest road and a feeder stream to the Davidson, we drop into downtown Brevard for a cheap dinner and a visit to the newly opened Brevard Brewing Company, which specializes in easy-drinking German style lagers.  The beer goes down easy, but we’re too beat from the ride to put a serious dent in the kegs. By 9:30, we’re tucked into our sleeping bags, drifting off to the babble of the creek a few feet from our tents. Check that off the list.We rise at the crack of 8 a.m. the next morning and drive the steep gravel road to the north side of Looking Glass, where a cluster of tall, granite boulders sits at the base of the cliff, known for its stout multi-pitch traditional routes. If we had the time, we would’ve hired a guide to take us up one of the easier routes on Looking Glass, but considering our brief window of opportunity, we’re happy to dink around on the boulders, which stand in the shadow of Looking Glass, both literally and figuratively.On the hike in, Jeremiah complains about his back hurting after sleeping on the camp pad. I tell him my hip is killing me.“I like camping in theory, but I think I might be more of a hotel guy now,” I say, as we approach the boulderfield.Pisgah National Forest Swimming HoleAt first glance, most of the boulders are featureless, and we have to hunt for the vague chalk residue left by previous boulderers. The majority of problems are in the V3-V7 range, well above our pay grade, but we spend some time playing around on a long, squat hunk of rock with a pyramid-shaped shelf rising and falling along its upper lip. There’s nothing in the way of a foothold, so we have to smear, trying to keep our feet pushed flat against the rock as we traverse to the right. We end up doing a mini-circuit of the boulder field, finding a fun, easy crack system that leads to a sketchy top-out, and an overhanging problem that’s way over our heads. The north side boulders don’t get a lot of attention, so the first person to climb each problem gets to contend with spiders and other creepy things stuck deep into the pocketed holds.One problem is so choked with spider webs, it looks like it’s covered with cotton candy, so we decide to skip it altogether.“Spiders didn’t used to bother me,” I tell Jeremiah as we hunt for something “cleaner” to climb.“Okay, grandpa,” Jeremiah says. It sounds mean, but he’s just upset because every picture I take seems to highlight his balding head.Even when we were climbing regularly, we weren’t very good, so our moves up each boulder now, after a year-long hiatus, are janky and comical. We make the easiest problem look impossible. Still, it’s fun to move like a climber again. It’s foreign and vaguely familiar at the same time.We power through peanut butter and jelly sandwiches as we drop back down the gravel road, leaving a gray-white wake of dust behind us on our way toward Nantahala National Forest, where a river full of rock hopping, waterfalls, and swimming holes awaits.The sky is getting increasingly dark as we park on the edge of Wolf Creek Lake, a gorgeous 183-acre body of water cut into the mountains west of Panthertown Valley that’s popular with anglers in trolling boats.  A thunderstorm is imminent, but we’re determined to tick the last item off our checklist, so we drop down the steep user-created trail that tumbles down the side of Wolf Creek Gorge. Say what you will about user-created paths, they get straight to the point. This trail follows the fall line over boulders and tangled roots and through tunnels of rhododendron, dropping several hundred feet in a quarter of a mile. It’s a completely unsustainable trail, but totally memorable.The trail bottoms out at the base of Paradise Falls on Wolf Creek. The falls itself is fairly unimpressive, a skinny shoot of water dropping maybe 15 feet. But the setting is unlike anything else I’ve seen in the South. A broad, deep, green pool leads to a 50-foot high slot canyon. Swim across that pool, and into the mouth of the canyon and you can climb a rope to the second story of the falls, where the gorge opens up and leads to a taller, more dramatic vertical falls. Paradise Falls is the most appropriately named waterfall I’ve ever seen.We throw rocks at some spooky looking fish that have been eyeballing us from the edge of the water and start swimming across the pool to the slot canyon. When I’m about 10 feet away from the entrance, I notice the giant snake, roughly the color of death, hanging out on the side of the canyon. Looking at me. Before I can finish saying, “shit, there’s a snake,” Jeremiah has already turned around and started swimming back to dry land.Sitting on the edge of the river, staring at the python, we try to figure out what a copperhead looks like. I’ve got no reception on my iPhone, so that’s no help, but the name of the falls (Paradise) and the giant snake at the entrance to said falls is all too biblical for me, so we decide to give the snake some space and start rock hopping downstream and look for a swimming hole with less symbolism.We find a few potholes to sink into and a mossy gorge with a slide but eventually decide it’s time to man up and face our fears. Luckily, by the time we swim back to the entrance of Paradise Falls, the snake is gone, so we don’t have to prove our manhood. Still, we feel like we’ve regained something. Yes, we’re scared of snakes and spiders and sleeping in a tent makes our hips hurt, but at our core, we are mountain men. At least, for a couple of days out of the year, when we’re not changing diapers or CC-ing 30 people on an email. •mini epic By the Numbers 4 – Number of adventures (mountain biking, bouldering, hiking, waterfall swimming)26 – Total number of hours on the trip door to door 1 – Number of breweries 26 – Miles driven during the two-day triplast_img read more

Wellington Wal-Mart will now go on the city tax roll after 5-year tax rebate program

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. -1 Vote up Vote down Price chopper · 396 weeks ago Maybe some of the locals may come to appreciate Wally now…. Report Reply 0 replies · active 396 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The Wellington Wal-Mart Super Center on the east edge of town has now been in operation for five years. And that is welcome news for the city of Wellington, because it can now start collecting on the discount store’s property taxes.Due to the Sumner County Neighborhood Revitalization Plan which was approved by the Wellington City Council, the Wal-Mart corporation has been receiving property tax rebates of 95 percent since the store has opened. But as of Jan. 1, 2013, those years are up. According to Della Rowley, Sumner County Appraiser, the Wal-Mart property is appraised at $9,010,060. At a assessed rate of 25 percent for commercial property, the city of Wellington’s assessed value will rise about $2.25 million. That will be welcome relief for the city of Wellington that has an overall assessed valuation of $41.75 million dollars in 2012.With Wal-Mart on the tax roll that puts the city of Wellington at around $44 million assuming the valuation elsewhere stays the same from the previous year. This is good news since the city of Wellington’s total assessed valuations dipped about $2 million from 2011 to 2012. Rowley said Wellington’s lower assessed valuation was due to a sluggish economy and the lack of housing sales from the previous year.So why has Wal-Mart not been paying city of Wellington property taxes for five years? The business took advantage of the NRP program which has been used to spark residential and commercial revitalization in Sumner County.On July 1, 2004, the Sumner County Commissioners approved a plan that is intended to promote the revitalization of Sumner County through “rehabilitation, conservation or redevelopment.” Thus within a 60-day period of getting a building permit, a business or residential property owner can apply for a tax rebate provided the construction is more than $5,000. A full rebate could go from one to five years.Thus, this program is used to spark economic and residential growth. Wal-Mart is far from being the only business or residential home to take advantage of the program.Wal-Mart, which was located on the west end of Wellington in the early part of the 2000′ decade, decided to build a Super Center more than five years ago which included a grocery store and larger retail selection base. The store opened in November of 2007.Wellington City Manager Gus Collins said the new influx of property taxes will help the city with budgetary concerns. A new budget is made annually in July. The new taxes from Walmart won’t be available until 2014.last_img read more

DONEGAL EA COUNT FINISHED – SIX ELECTED

first_imgIndependent candidate John Campbell has been re-elected alongside Fine Gael Councillor Barry O’Neil and Sinn Féin candidate Noel Andrew Jordan. Shock has been expressed that Fianna Fáil Councillor Brendan Byrne has lost his seat in the Donegal EA.Independent candidates Niamh Kennedy and Tom Conaghan were elected earlier in the evening. Fianna Fáil stalwart Sean McEniff won re-election to the council chambers in Lifford also. DONEGAL EA COUNT FINISHED – SIX ELECTED was last modified: May 25th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:newsPoliticslast_img read more