Anthropology with a family touch

first_imgAfter loading the four huge vehicles with petrol drums, spare auto parts, barrels of water, crates of canned food, medicines, notebooks, rifles, film, and photographic equipment, the Cambridge, Massachusetts, couple, their two children, and an expedition team slowly caravanned into the desert. It was June 1951 — winter in South West Africa — and so cold that their blankets froze stiff in the night frost, so hot their radiators boiled over by day.— Ilisa Barbash, “Where the Roads All End: Photography and Anthropology in the Kalahari” (Peabody Museum Press, 2016) It was the second of eight expeditions by the Marshall family to the Kalahari region of what is now Namibia, and the start of a photographic experiment that became one of the most holistic efforts to document the cultures of Southwest Africa’s indigenous hunter-gatherers.“The Marshalls were not the first to do this work, but they were the best,” says Peabody Museum curator of visual anthropology Ilisa Barbash. Her exhibition, “Kalahari Perspectives: Anthropology, Photography, and the Marshall Family,” which includes more than 40 images from the family’s expeditions, is on view at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology through March 31.Sensing the hunter-gatherer way of life was on the verge of disappearing due to colonial expansion and Westernization, Laurence Marshall, a physicist and retired co-founder of Raytheon, proposed to the Peabody a comprehensive ethnographic study. His expeditions from 1950 to 1961 with his wife, Lorna, and their teenage children, Elizabeth and John, yielded 40,000 images that showed Ju/’hoan and /Gwi men, women, and children at work and play, revealing their culture as well as their humanity.,Previously, the groups then widely known as “bushmen,” a collective name for hunter-gatherer peoples now seen as pejorative, had been depicted as primitive, romantic, or exotic. As they got to know their subjects, the Marshalls’ images became ever more dynamic and intimate, with the Ju/’hoansi appearing as individuals rather than as anthropological specimens.The Peabody exhibit also features two new visual projects about contemporary Kalahari peoples. In addition, the museum will screen John Marshall’s documentary film “N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman” at 6 p.m. Oct. 11 followed by a panel discussion.,“The Marshalls planned a pure study that could be used then and in the future,” Barbash said. “And this is amazing — they learned on the fly. None of them had formal training in film or anthropology. Fortunately, Laurence Marshall was such a good organizer that he was able to keep his family alive in the desert, by calculating how much water was needed, and figuring out where to leave gas cans in the Kalahari.”last_img read more

Arsenal prepared to listen to offers for Chelsea & Man Utd target Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang

first_img Comment Advertisement Aubamayang wants to be paid on par with top earner Ozil (Picture: Getty)Aubameyang appears to have many suitors and is reportedly eager to play Champions League football next season.Leicester City’s Jamie Vardy (19) is the only player to score more in the Premier League than Aubameyang this season.Aubameyang has bagged 17 goals and is challenging to win his second successive Premier League Golden Boot.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe forward would presumably fetch a big fee despite his age due to his remarkable goalscoring record.Since joining Arsenal from Borussia Dortmund in a £56million deal in January 2018, Aubameyang has scored 61 goals in 97 games for the Gunners.Arsenal’s rivals including Chelsea believe the London club will be forced to sell their star striker in the next transfer window.MORE: Chelsea target Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang as Arsenal’s rivals believe striker will be soldMORE: Arsenal targeting £35m-rated Celtic ace Odsonne Edouard as Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s replacementFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page. Aubameyang has many suitors (Picture: Getty)Arsenal are ready to listen to offers for Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang after shelving contract talks with the striker, according to reports.Aubameyang has been the subject of intense transfer speculation this season, with Barcelona, Inter, Manchester United and Chelsea linked with the goalscorer.Discussions over a new deal have ground to halt since Aubameyang demanded £300,000 a week to stay at the club.Read the latest updates: Coronavirus news liveADVERTISEMENTArsenal have already convinced most of their first-team squad to take a 12.5 per cent pay cut for the next 12 months amid the coronavirus pandemic.Aubameyang’s current deal expires next year and the Daily Mail claim Arsenal have decided to stop negotiations with the Gabon International.AdvertisementAdvertisementThe club’s financial problems appears set to have an effect on contract talks, as well any potential transfer business.Arsenal are prepared to field offers for Aubameyang, as the Gunners bid to avoid losing the 30-year-old on a free transfer next year. Metro Sport ReporterFriday 24 Apr 2020 5:35 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5.6kShares Arsenal prepared to listen to offers for Chelsea & Man Utd target Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang Advertisementlast_img read more

Dutch government abandons plan for National Mortgages Institution

first_imgTwo years ago, the NHI was expected to issue at least €25bn in government-backed mortgage bonds within five years.But now the need for an NHI is far less urgent, according to housing minister Stref Blok.In a letter to Parliament, he noted an improvement in the market, driven by a sharp decline in mortgage rates and a narrowing funding gap at banks through alternative means of financing.At the same time, Dutch pension funds have increased their investments in mortgage funds, in 2014, nearly doubling their holdings to €6.7bn.Despite this increase, mortgage funds – which consist largely of indirect investments by pension funds through asset manager funds, or co-operation with other market players – still account for just 1% of all issued residential mortgages in the Netherlands. After the government’s announcement that the NHI would be scrapped, a spokesman for MN, the €110bn asset manager for the large metal schemes PME and PMT, said the Dutch mortgage market had finally “sorted itself out”.He noted that pension funds had been investing increasingly in mortgage funds, with PMT recently an additional €1bn commitment to the Dutch Mortgage Funding Company (DMFCO).Jeroen van Hessen, managing partner at the DMFCO, said: “We are pleased the market can do its job now. The combination of mortgages, state support and banks in the NHI was not a good idea from the start.”PGGM, which had been involved in the establishment of the NHI, said it was pleased with this “workable” instrument.However, it declined to confirm whether it would have invested in NHI-issued bonds.At present, PGGM does not invest in mortgages. Meanwhile, APG, the €424bn asset manager for ABP, said it understood the banks’ conclusion that complying with the European Commission’s conditions would have meant they would lose money by participating in the NHI. The Dutch government has scrapped plans for a National Mortgages Institution (NHI) after the parties involved in the project failed to agree on how best to address the European Commission’s decision that the NHI would be tantamount to state aid.Jan van Rutte, a former banker who was responsible for setting up the institution, said the European Commission’s conditions for preventing unintended state support – or passing financial benefits on to consumers – were “too stringent”.The Dutch government intended the NHI to stabilise financing in the local residential mortgage market.It was to streamline access to the market and increase competition via the issuance of government-backed mortgage bonds.last_img read more

Support palliative care not euthanasia, urges NSW Council of Churches

first_imgChristian Today Australia 9 May 2013The NSW Council of Churches today called on all members of the NSW Legislative Council to vote against a private member’s bill that would legalise euthanasia and assisted suicide in NSW.“This is a dangerous bill. If enacted, the bill will redefine the value of the lives of some people as not worth living. Our challenge as a society is to transform the experience of people who are disabled or dying, not to intervene to end their lives,” the President of the NSW Council of Churches, the Reverend Dr Ross Clifford, said.“For Christians, the Bible makes it clear that human life and human dignity must be protected. We already have good laws and policies that support compassionate care of the terminally ill. If the system is not broken, don’t try to fix it,” Dr Clifford said.“Advances in palliative care make assisted death unnecessary. Instead of wasting taxpayers’ money on reviews of every death by euthanasia, the NSW Government should improve resources for palliative care so that terminally ill patients in our community receive the care and comfort they deserve at the end of life to minimize suffering.”“This bill will enshrine the right to kill and be killed in NSW law. It will endanger disabled people who cannot speak for themselves, and who may be seen as an unnecessary burden by their family or the state. We cannot be sure the proposed law will never be extended to include incapacitated patients.The legal right to kill patients does nothing to enhance human dignity, yet this bill makes medical homicide legal. Should we dismiss concerns of doctors who say, ‘This is not what we became doctors to do’? I urge all NSW politicians to vote against the Rights of the Terminally Ill Bill 2013,” Dr Clifford said.http://au.christiantoday.com/article/support-palliative-care-not-euthanasia-urges-nsw-council-of-churches/15393.htmlast_img read more