Neil Young Releases Unheard Acoustic Recordings From 1976 With ‘The Hitchhiker’

first_imgAt the time of the sessions that eventually became The Hitchhiker, Neil Young was slowly emerging from one of the darkest periods of his personal and musical life. Afraid of getting type cast as an acoustic lightweight, he had embraced the use of heavy-rock instrumentation, pushing away a fair chunk of his fan base from his Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and Harvest period. Coupled with a melancholy mood permeating his life and music that brought on by the death of former Crazy Horse bandmate Danny Whitten, at the time, Young was clearly working through a sea-change in his personal philosophy.The opening song of Hitchhiker, “Pocahontas,” is familiar to fans of Rust Never Sleeps, but this version is infinitely more intimate than any version previously known. Young was very aware of the painful history of the native populations in the Americas and likely identified with their loss of identity. At the time of the song’s writing, these issues were once again on the minds of many Americans, and Young used his trademark nasal vocals to decry American Indians’ treatment and losses.The following tune, “Powderfinger,” continued the vision of forceful loss of culture. The uncertainty of the words is palpable and is a stunning contrast to his innate comfort on the vocals and guitar. On “Captain Kennedy,” his simple percussive taps on the hollow body of his guitar are a powerful touch that echoes the heartbeat and that fade as the protagonist faces his fate. The occasional chuckles and comments before the beginning of these tracks offer an interesting insight into Young’s mood during the recording session as well, like the self-starting thought at the start of “Hawaii.” “Give Me Strength” is the clearest picture of Young’s low emotional ebb, serving as a naked look at his disconnection. The raw nature of the track is part song, part longing for hope.By the time title track “Hitchhiker” rolls around, he seems to accept his place as a transitional force in the lives of everyone around him. With a painful divorce recently completed and a growing alienation from his friends and family, Young seemed in danger of fading away into a drug addled haze. The songs he wrote and recorded for Hitchhiker were clearly him realizing the dangers he faced and repudiating them with all the artistic fight he could muster. While fear of pigeon-holing prevented the release of The Hitchhiker at that point in his career, hearing them now is a wonderful insight into Young’s mindset at the time and moving forward. Though he was loathe to coast on his past successes, he was more than capable of making truly meaningful music in his older styles. That Young decided to fight against creative and personal stagnation and gave us one of the artist’s angriest and most seminal works. Luckily for all of us, we are now gifted with the opportunity to look at what might have been as well as what was. For his thirty-eighth solo record, The Hitchhiker, Neil Young decided to go old school—literally. All the tracks featured on the acoustic album were recorded in a single day in 1976 and have languished in archives ever since. Though some of these tracks were reworked and appeared on later albums, such as Young’s seminal Rust Never Sleeps, the songs were never heard in their original acoustic format—that is, until now. The reasons why this material ended up collecting dust for decades is almost as interesting as the music itself. You can hear The Hitchhiker in its entirety and check out our review of the album below.last_img read more

The morality of meatlessness: Why children choose vegetarianism

first_imgThe study began a few years ago when Karen Hussar, Ed.M.’06, Ed.D.’07, then a doctoral student, became interested in children who chose to become vegetarians at a young age (6-10) despite being raised in meat-eating families. To what extent, she wondered, was this decision based on morals, not health?In September, Professor Paul Harris, Hussar’s adviser and project collaborator, presented Hussar’s ongoing research at a discussion sponsored by the Ed School’s Civic and Moral Education Initiative. Harris explained that Hussar studied these “independent vegetarian” children, as she called them, as well as “family vegetarians” — children who grew up in vegetarian families — and a third group who, Harris said, “ate and enjoyed meat.”The initial question they explored was how these children view meat eating and why they might not eat meat. The independent vegetarians overwhelmingly cited animal rights as a top reason for not eating meat, while family vegetarians split the reasons between animal rights, family influence, and religion. Meat eaters said health and taste were top reasons for not eating certain meats.“This first study was simple yet provocative,” said Harris, “with the independent vegetarians giving genuine moral reasons: the suffering and death that meat eating entails. They empathize with the pain and distress.”Read more about the study: Read Full Storylast_img read more

A symposium on teaching, learning

first_imgThe Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT) is planning a University-wide symposium designed to engage faculty and students in dialogue and debate, while sharing ideas and information about pedagogical innovation.The conference on Feb. 3 will bring together members of the Harvard community with leading scholars and teachers from both the University and beyond its gates to share their perspectives on teaching and learning in higher education. The session will be held in Harvard’s Northwest Science Building.Developed as part of a $40 million gift from Rita E. and Gustave M. Hauser, the event aims to stimulate discussion around evidence-based innovation in education. Sessions will pose key questions and offer perspectives aimed at helping to inform future pedagogies; to showcase novel, inventive, or exceptional approaches to teaching; and to forge connections across the University and beyond. Organizers hope that participants will, in effect, become students during the daylong symposium, learning new teaching techniques and strategies that they can use in their classrooms and share with colleagues.“We will provide the means and encouragement to faculty to teach in new, exciting ways,” said Harvard President Drew Faust. “We will embrace opportunities to harness technology. We will support a cycle of creativity and renewal by evaluating methods and courses and programs, by experimenting and letting ourselves fail in some instances so that we can be bold enough to succeed in others.”A series of interactive breakout sessions will highlight improved learning through innovation in practice. There will be three keynote discussions, including “The Science of Learning,” “Innovation in Higher Education,” and “Looking to the Future.”Participants include Steven Pinker, the Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology and Harvard College Professor; John Palfrey, Henry N. Ess III Professor of Law and faculty co-director of Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society; and Harvard Provost Alan Garber.Simultaneously, HILT will sponsor a resource fair open to the Harvard community. The fair, located in the Northwest Building’s garden level, will feature representatives from the University’s teaching and learning centers, related interfaculty initiatives, academic technology resources, museums, and libraries.Seating for the event is limited. Faculty, students, and staff interested in attending can apply for tickets. Segments of the symposium will also be streamed live from 8:15 to 10 a.m. and from 10:30 to noon at www.harvard.edu/livestream.The Hausers’ gift launched the initiative in October and is meant to serve as a catalyst for transforming students’ educational experience. The fund enables the University to marshal its considerable intellectual resources to engage a new generation of students with pioneering teaching practices, building on the long history of educational reform at Harvard.See more information on the Hauser gift and the initiative.last_img read more

UN braces half a million in Haiti for storm threat

first_img Relief agencies on 2 November stepped up emergency plans to protect up to 500,000 Haitians from a tropical storm forecast to hit the country amid fears that it could also help the cholera epidemic spread. “The UN in Haiti, MINUSTAH (peacekeeping force), are setting up an emergency plan designed to cope with Hurricane Tomas, which is approaching the island and could affect up to half a million people,” said UN spokeswoman Corinne Momal Vanian. Some of the 1.3 million homeless quake victims have been evacuated from flimsy makeshift camps in the Port-au-Prince area, while food supplies for 1.1 million people as well as shelter and medical supplies were pre-positioned. International Organization for Migration (IOM) spokesman Jean Philippe Chauzy said the storm “could aggravate the cholera epidemic” if it hit the country by helping the waterborne bacterial disease spread into Port-au-Prince. Haiti has already suffered the double blow this year of a devastating earthquake that leveled parts of the capital, killing 250,000 people, in January, as well as an unprecedented cholera epidemic that has infected more than 4,700 people further north and killed 337 since late October. Hurricane Tomas has been downgraded to a tropical storm and was tracking westwards about 250 kilometers south of Port-au-Prince, but local forecasters predicted it would swing northwards and reach Haiti on 5 November, the World Meteorological Organization said. WMO meteorologist Christian Blondin nonetheless added a note of caution about the high margin of error of such hurricane forecasts. Aid agencies still fear the impact of a tropical storm, even if it brushes the island with lashings of rain. The IOM also raised concerns about the vulnerability of open latrines and untreated water supplies in the city’s slums. Southwestern coastal towns of Jacmel and Leogane were the most exposed to the storm, the UN humanitarian coordination office (OCHA) warned. By Dialogo November 03, 2010last_img read more

S. Huntington Crash Kills 1, Critically Injures Driver

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A two-car crash in South Huntington Friday night killed one man and critically injured another, Suffolk County police said.The deadly crash occurred around 8:20 p.m. when 23-year-old Fermin Estevez, who was driving a 2003 Acura southbound on Pidgeon Hill Road, crossed into the northbound lane and struck a 2013 Toyota minivan with a family of five inside, police said.The victim, 30-year-old Coles Jacquet of Huntington Station, a passenger in the Acura, was pronounced dead at the scene by a physician assistant from the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office, police said.Estevez, a Greenlawn resident, was transported by police helicopter to Stony Brook University Hospital and is listed in critical condition with head injuries, police said.The driver of the minivan, 34-year-old Anthony Depalo, his wife Sharon, also 34, and their three children, a 5-year-old boy, 3-year-old boy, and 6-month-old girl, were transported to Huntington Hospital after the crash. Depalo and his kids were treated and released, police said. His wife was treated for minor injuries.Police impounded the vehicles for safety checks, police said. The investigation is ongoing.Detectives ask anyone with information about the crash to contact the Second Squad at 631-854-8252 or call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS.last_img read more

Credit unions: Your fate hangs on your mobile experience

first_imgMobile now plays a fundamental role in consumers’ lives. eMarketer estimates that customers spend nearly three hours per day on their mobile device — more than on their computers. Meanwhile, 47% of Millennials in an Annalect study noted that someone else’s following, liking, pinning, or tweeting info on social media had helped introduce them to a brand. In April 2015, Google announced that “Google Search will be expanding its use of mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal.”And yet the banking industry’s mobile capabilities lag far behind consumers’ expectations. Not only do financial institutions need to catch up, they must also worry about being able to deliver what customers will expect three to five years from now.How should banks use mobile to build relationships and increase sales? A report from Celent, commissioned by Facebook, says that banking providers who get it right will engage consumers more deeply, win a disproportionate share of customers, have greater success defending against fintech challengers, achieve better cross-sell rates, and improve customer satisfaction.Needless to say, the stakes are high.The report from Facebook and Celent focuses on how banks and credit unions can leverage mobile specifically as a relationship-building and sales tool. Dan Latimore, SVP of Banking at Celent and author of the report, says that well-designed mobile interactions simplify the user experience and minimize the effort required to enjoy it. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Will the monkey ever get off our back?

first_imgI was perusing the credit union web the other day, and I found an interesting article out on NACUSO.org. It was a summary of a survey done by CU Service Network back in 2016. The survey was given to 60 credit union CEOs whose assets ranged from 30 million to 1.6 billion. These CEOs were asked about their credit unions top issues and burdens. I will give you three guesses on what they said was the top issue…go ahead…If you guessed the weather, you were off by just a bit; it was actually compliance. 93% of the CEOs surveyed said they are concerned about meeting all of their compliance requirements. This is just a shot in the dark, but I am guessing this would be a pretty standard response if you asked any other CEO this same question.Trust me guys and gals, I get it. It is my job to dive in and dissect this stuff every day, and I have to admit that there are days it seems like a never ending jungle of information. Unfortunately for those of you that feel like you are lost in the jungle, it doesn’t look like that rescue helo is coming anytime soon. But just because the rescue squad might not be coming, doesn’t mean we can’t Bear Grylls our way out of this forest. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Indonesia’s 2020 census to recruit 390,000 volunteers, keen to follow S. Korea footsteps

first_img“The 2020 census will put BPS’ credibility and name on the line,” Suhariyanto said in a separate press statement on Friday.He said the online census would be available from Feb. 15 to March 31. President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and several governors will be among the first to put their data into the system tomorrow, he said.People can register online through BPS’ website, which will require family card and ID card numbers. The questionnaire will have 22 questions that range from the registrant’s name, birth date, place of birth, religion, education level, to occupation. No questions on earnings or related questions will be asked.In July, BPS volunteers accompanied by neighborhood unit (RT) heads will then record those who have yet to register online. Suhariyanto said that it aimed to obtain census results by January next year.He added that the BPS had worked with the National Cyber and Encryption Agency (BSSN) and Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), among others, to ensure data security during online registration.Topics : Indonesia will hire around 390,000 volunteers starting early April to help the 2020 census fieldwork in July as it aims to replicate South Korea’s census success.Statistics Indonesia (BPS) will combine door-to-door interviews and data gathering from the Home Ministry’s Population and Civil Registration Directorate General for the 2020 census, making it the country’s first time to use such a method.However, BPS head Suhariyanto said on Thursday that the country could continue to improve its administrative system so that the agency would solely rely on the directorate general to obtain data in the future, similar to how South Korea executed its census. “I hope that we will one day reach that point. We need to take examples from those who are progressive because administrative data is really important,” Suhariyanto told reporters in Jakarta.The population census is done every 10 years and aims to update data the country’s demographics, which are crucial to supporting certain policy interventions, Suhariyanto said.The 2015 intercensal survey projected that Indonesia would have a population of around 266.9 million in 2019 and leap to 319 million by 2045.The 2020 census will provide insight on the population, in addition to age and gender composition, among other things. Such information could help Indonesia keep track of its demographic dividend, which the country is expected to benefit from with its huge working-age group – projected to reach 70 percent of the total population by 2030.last_img read more

Trump hair rinsing complaints prompt US to ease shower standards

first_imgThe Energy Department also proposed easier standards on clothes washers. The Trump administration says its regulatory rollbacks save average American households $3,100 a year. But conservationists say easing bathroom fixture standards could boost energy and water costs.It was uncertain whether the plan would be finalized. Trump is campaigning for reelection and trails in opinion polls ahead of the vote Nov. 3. If he wins and the proposal advances it could also face court battles.David Friedman, vice president of advocacy at the organization Consumer Reports and a former Energy Department official, said there was no need to change the rules because tests show today’s shower heads “achieve high levels of customer satisfaction,” while saving money.  The US government proposed rule changes on Wednesday that would allow shower heads to boost water pressure, after President Donald Trump repeatedly complained that bathroom fixtures do not work to his liking.The Department of Energy plan followed comments from Trump last month a White House event on rolling back regulations. He said he believed water does not come out fast enough from fixtures.”So what do you do? You just stand there longer or you take a shower longer? Because my hair – I don’t know about you, but it has to be perfect.” Last December, Trump said environmental regulators were looking at sinks, faucets and toilets to revise rules meant to conserve water and fuel that heats it.”People are flushing toilets 10 times, 15 times, as opposed to once,” Trump told a meeting of small business leaders at the White House.Consumer groups decried the plan, saying current rules saved consumers money by conserving water and fuel.The proposal would effectively allow shower fixtures to include multiple shower heads that would get around the 2.5 gallon (9.4 liter) per minute standard Congress set in 1992, when Trump’s fellow Republican George H.W. Bush was president.center_img Topics :last_img read more

50,000 Pennsylvanians Download COVID Alert PA App in first 24 Hours, Governor Urges Everyone to Make Your Phone Part of the Fight

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter 50,000 Pennsylvanians Download COVID Alert PA App in first 24 Hours, Governor Urges Everyone to Make Your Phone Part of the Fight September 23, 2020center_img Innovation,  Press Release,  Public Health Governor Tom Wolf and Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine announced the availability of the COVID Alert PA app that can notify users if they may have been exposed to COVID-19 without revealing their identity or location. Since the announcement, 50,000 Pennsylvanians have downloaded the app, and the governor is encouraging more to follow suit.“I encourage all Pennsylvanians to download the app on a personal mobile device to help in the fight against COVID-19,” Gov. Wolf said. “The more people who download the app, the more effective it will be in helping to stop the spread of COVID. Please download it today and make your phone part of the fight.”COVID Alert PA is a free, voluntary mobile app developed by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in partnership with NearForm, UPenn and MIT Lincoln Laboratory using the Apple and Google Exposure Notification System. The app’s features include an interactive COVID-19 symptom checker, opt-in for alerts for potential exposures to the virus, updates on the latest public health data about COVID-19 in PA and advice for what to do if you have a potential exposure to COVID-19.The app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa.”The app is designed with privacy at the forefront. The app does not use GPS, location services, or any movement or geographical information. It will never collect, transmit or store personal information. In other words, it is completely anonymous.Here’s how COVID Alert PA works:The app uses anonymous Bluetooth low energy proximity technology to know when your phone is within 6 feet of another phone with the app for 15 minutes or more.When an app user confirms a positive COVID-19 test result in the app, it will check to see if it matches any of the anonymous Bluetooth close contact interactions your phone has had over the last 14 days.If there is a match, COVID Alert PA may send an alert after taking into account the date, duration of exposure and the Bluetooth signal strength (which is used to estimate how close your phone was to the phone of the person having a positive test result).“Our success in overcoming the virus depends on all of us and our collective behaviors, including wearing a mask, social distancing, proper hygiene and staying home if you feel sick,” Dr. Levine said. “The COVID Alert PA app is an additional powerful tool that can be used on a voluntary basis to help keep yourself and those you care about safe.”Find more information on the COVID Alert Pennsylvania app here.last_img read more